Services & Fees

  1. Initial intakes, the review of your claim as set forth in the website intake questionnaire (hard copies can be faxed), are free of charge. Upon review, you will be contacted within 36 hours of receipt to establish a date and time for consultation, for further review and discussion. All consultations are $450 due at the time of the consultation meeting. If the Firm offers to handle the case, a proposed retainer will be provided at the close of the consultation meeting.
  2. A retainer agreement is required upon your retention of the Firm's services. Legal advice will not be provided until the retainer agreement is executed. The Firm's billing rates vary upon the nature of the work.
  3. Billing rates are available upon request.
  4. In the instance of litigation, a retainer deposit is required to cover court costs, discovery expense, and costs associated with all motion practice. Such amounts will be deposited in the Firm's client trust account, as required, and dispersed in accordance with the terms of the retainer agreement.
  5. The Firm will take contingency fee cases in certain matters. A listing of such matters is available on request.
  6. A monthly statement of services detailing work performed and the time associated with all activities will be provided to you at the close of each month. Fees are due and owing within 20 days. If your retainer deposit is exhausted, a new deposit will be required so that it may be billed against as services and expenses are incurred.
  7. Remember that there are very short time frames for enforcing many employment and employee benefit claims. Therefore, always remember that time is off the essence when determining whether and how you wish to enforce your rights and protect your interests.
  8. For your convenience, the Firm accepts Visa and MasterCard.

Contact Us

Clark Law Group, PLLC
1100 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Suite 920
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 293-0015
Fax: (202) 293-0115
Google+

Clark Weekly

Clark Weekly

Topic of the Week

What are Right-to-Work laws and how do they affect you?

In the public-sector union context, right-to-work laws mean that union members do not have to pay union dues to be members of the union. In states that have enacted right-to-work laws that apply to private employers, although states vary, most Right-to-

Read more...

Blog of the Week

You Can Be Fired for Not Showing Up to Work During a Hurricane

We all know that you can lose your home and your belongings, but politicians never talk about the fact that during a disaster, many people can lose their jobs as well.

Thought for the Week

""The great majority of pregnant women and new mothers want to breastfeed but face significant barriers in community, health care, and employment settings." "

–Senate resolution marking National Breastfeeding Month.

List of the Week

from Workplace Fairness

What do people want to know about discrimination in the workplace?

Top five searches in discrimination topics this week:

  • Sex and Gender Discrimination
  • Religious Discrimination
  • Proving Discrimination
  • Language Discrimination
  • Pay Discrimination

Top Five News Headlines

  1. Why pulling an Omarosa and secretly recording coworkers is probably a bad idea
  2. Wages Are Low and Workers Are Scarce. Wait, What?
  3. Millennials United: Labor Unions Enjoy a Youthful Surge
  4. Facebook sued over allegations of gender bias in male-targeted job ads
  5. Dangerous Jobs Also Put Workers at Risk of Opioid Dependency